SUSSEX HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS FOR OBESITY COMPLICATIONS ON THE RISE SAYS THE ARGUS

According to The Argus on Tuesday 4th March, Doctors treated seriously overweight people 9,258 times in a single year – a third more than the year before. This total includes those who need gastric bands and other weight loss surgery as well as those admitted to hospitals for weight-related problems such as a heart attack or diabetes. Obesity and associated problems costs the NHS in Sussex an estimated £460 million a year. In East and West Sussex, some 65% of adults are overweight or obese. I work primarily with people who are overweight and obese. Working from the inside out, we uncover the root emotional reasons why the client is holding on to excess weight. Strange though it sounds, this may be tracked back to a previous life, or even to a spirit “passenger” with a sweet tooth.  Or it could be that excess weight is a form of comfort or protection – once the key emotional issues have been resolved, the excess weight is no longer needed and just falls away. If appropriate, I will do a hypnotic gastric band operation. The risk of death following a gastric by-pass operation is 1 in 100, and following gastric band surgery the risk of death is 1 in 200. The hypnotic gastric band is safe, non-invasive and only costs £395. If you’d like to know more, call me on 07597 020 512. Related content – Weight...

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WORKSHOP: PAST LIVES AND LIFE BETWEEN LIVES, SUNDAY 16th MARCH

        HALF-DAY WORKSHOP SUNDAY 16th MARCH         10am – 1pm            £20                        VININGS NATURAL HEALTH CENTRE Clover Court, Church Road, Haywards Heath  RH16 3UF Past lives can impact your life today in many ways – health, money, relationships and more . . . Soul groups travel through many lifetimes together – who’s in yours? Déjà vu, recurring dreams, instant attractions, irrational phobias, persistent physical ailments . . . the answers could well in another lifetime! In my many years of working with clients, I have come to understand just how many issues can be traced back to past lives. Find that root cause and so often it brings valuable insights as well as resolving the problems. In a small group we’ll explore and discuss key issues that impact our lives in more ways than we may think – and who knows what you’ll uncover! If you’d like to come along, email me through the form on this site or call me on 07597 020 512....

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THE BRAIN IN THE GUT – MEET ERIC!

We all know that we have a brain in our heads – but did you know that we have a second brain? And that it’s located in our gut? It’s official name is the Enteric Nervous System (ENS) – but I think Eric is easier to remember, don’t you? Eric the ENS has at least 100 million neurons, which is about the same as a cat’s brain – and you know how smart cats can be! This brain is not a mass, as the brain in our head: rather it is a sort of mesh, or network, located under the mucosal lining and between the muscular layers of the esophagus, the stomach and the small and large intestines, so it is several metres long. Eric the ENS is connected to the brain in our head by the Vagus Nerve, that runs from the abdomen to the brain. But if the Vagus Nerve is cut, Eric the ENS continues to function quite happily, controlling and co-ordinating the process of digestion and all that goes with it. In fact, some 90% of all the signals that pass along that Vagus Nerve are messages from Eric to the brain, and not from the brain to Eric – so it could be said that, actually, Eric’s in charge! Just think for a moment of all the common expressions we use – “I’m gutted”; “it’s a gut reaction” “I can’t stomach it any more”; “I’ve got butterflies in my stomach” – to mention a few. These are all linked to responses from Eric the ENS to our moods and emotions: in fact it is often Eric the ENS who tells the head brain how we are feeling! What does Eric the ENS do? Quite a lot, actually – it controls the mechanical blending of food in the stomach, and ensures that the pH balance is right at various sections of the system. When we digest food it goes through a process where it is first broken down by an alkaline mix and then by a special acid mix: it is important to keep the two separate and both working as they should. it identifies bad bacteria that may have got into the system via the digestive system (eg in something you have eaten). If the sensors on the gut wall detect something that shouldn’t be there, substances such as histamine are released. This alerts Eric to one of several responses – diarrhea perhaps, or a message up the Vagus Nerve to the head brain, who will trigger vomiting: both designed to get the bad stuff out of the system. it produces as much dopamine (the pleasure and reward molecule) as the head brain. it...

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